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Property Education 
(27-04-2011)
  • House votes to simplify education tax breaks
    The House passed a bill Thursday that would simplify a complicated patchwork of tax breaks for higher education but would exclude many graduate students. The bill would make permanent a tax credit that ...More

  • War College to investigate plagiarism allegations

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., right, and his son Michael leave the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, after a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony with Vice President Joe Biden. Walsh's thesis written for the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages that appear to be taken word-for-word from previously published papers. The Democrat is running to keep the seat he was appointed to in February. Walsh faces Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Daines on Nov. 4. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Sen. John Walsh remained steadfast Thursday amid an investigation into whether he plagiarized a research project required for a master's degree, winning fresh backing from fellow Democrats in Montana and the governor who appointed him to the Senate earlier this year.


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  • Walsh campaign: Senator won't withdraw from race

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., right, and his son Michael leave the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, after a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony with Vice President Joe Biden. Walsh's thesis written for the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages that appear to be taken word-for-word from previously published papers. The Democrat is running to keep the seat he was appointed to in February. Walsh faces Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Daines on Nov. 4. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Sen. John Walsh remained steadfast Thursday amid allegations he plagiarized a research project required for a master's degree, winning fresh backing from fellow Democrats in Montana and the governor who appointed him to the Senate earlier this year.


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  • Senator says he had PTSD when he wrote thesis

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., right, and his son Michael leave the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, after a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony with Vice President Joe Biden. Walsh's thesis written for the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages that appear to be taken word-for-word from previously published papers. The Democrat is running to keep the seat he was appointed to in February. Walsh faces Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Daines on Nov. 4. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)Sen. John Walsh of Montana said Wednesday his failure to attribute conclusions and verbatim passages lifted from other scholars' work in his thesis to earn a master's degree from the U.S. Army War College was an unintentional mistake caused in part by post-traumatic stress disorder.


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  • Paying Teachers to Give Up Tenure: What’s the Right Price?
    Education reformer Michelle Rhee once called teacher tenure the Holy Grail of elementary and secondary school educators. In the latest tenure fight, a California judge last month ruled that the state’s last-hired, first-fired teacher tenure system deprives minority and low-income students of an equal education. Economist Allison Schrager, however, has proposed an alternative view that could help end the fighting: Convince teachers to trade job protection for cold, hard cash. Surveys show that public school teachers are among society’s lowest-paid workers;More

  • Newark, N.J., schools probed after claims of race discrimination
    By David Jones NEWARK N.J. (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Education said on Wednesday it was investigating complaints that a plan to reorganize public schools in Newark, New Jersey, discriminates against black students. A parent-led group in New Jersey's largest city has said that school closings and conversions to charter schools under the "One Newark" plan disproportionately affect black students. "We can confirm that the Office for Civil Rights is investigating whether the Newark Public Schools’ enactment of the 'One Newark' plan at the end of the 2013-2014 school year discriminates against black students on the basis of race," an Education Department spokesman said in a statement.More

  • Montana US senator's thesis appears to plagiarize

    Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., leaves the Capitol June 3, 2014Montana Sen. John Walsh's thesis written to earn a master's degree from the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages taken word-for-word from previously published papers.


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  • Stray Decimal Points Put Thousands of Students' Financial Aid in Jeopardy

    Stray Decimal Points Put Thousands of Students' Financial Aid in JeopardyA mistake in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application forms could cost tens of thousands of students their financial aid.  The Department of Education told The Associated Press that a change in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, resulted in many students incorrectly entering their personal income levels. They estimate up to 200,000 people were wrongly declared eligible and others were incorrectly denied.  The DOE is trying to identify who was incorrectly selected for the Pell Grants and have since corrected the error on the online form, which stemmed from rogue decimal points.


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  • Montana senator's thesis appears to plagiarize

    FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 26, 2014, file photo, U.S. Sen. John Walsh speaks to reporters in Helena, Mont. The Democrat's thesis written for the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages that appear to be taken word-for-word from previously published papers. Walsh faces Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Daines on Nov. 4.(AP Photo/Matt Volz, File)HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana Sen. John Walsh's thesis written to earn a master's degree from the U.S. Army War College contains unattributed passages taken word-for-word from previously published papers.


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  • Lawsuit challenges Louisiana governor's plan to ditch Common Core
    By Jonathan Kaminsky NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - A group of charter schools, teachers and parents filed suit on Tuesday against Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, asserting that he overstepped his authority and has sown chaos by moving last month to ditch the Common Core education standards for teaching English and math which he helped usher in four years ago. "The governor is acting beyond the scope of his powers under the state constitution," said Stephen Kupperman, attorney for the plaintiffs. Louisiana Education Superintendent John White has said the state must use the tests despite the governor's plan. "The Louisiana Department of Education needs to stop delaying, issue an RFP (request for proposal) and follow the law," Jindal said in a statement.More

  • Most victims of fiery California bus crash died of smoke inhalation

    A FedEx truck drives past a makeshift memorial beside Interstate 5 in Orland, California(Reuters) - Most of the 10 people killed in a fiery crash of a bus full of college hopefuls in Northern California survived the initial impact and died of smoke inhalation from flames that engulfed the vehicle, the county coroner said on Tuesday. Seven of those who died after a FedEx truck crashed into the bus taking high school students to a college recruitment event in April succumbed to asphyxiation due to smoke inhalation, while two died of trauma sustained in the crash, the Glenn County Coroner's Office said. The dead in the crash in the city of Orland, an agricultural community north of Sacramento, included five Los Angeles-area students on their way to tour a Northern California university campus, as well as their chaperones and both drivers. While traveling south on Interstate 5, the FedEx truck gradually veered left and crossed a 58-foot-wide median before entering oncoming lanes of traffic, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report published in April.


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  • There’s No Point in Releasing Prisoners, Ever—Unless We Do This
    In her college-level classes in New York’s correctional institutions, Baz Dreisinger has students who come from all races and backgrounds, and they are often extremely intelligent. The academic director of the Prison-to-College Pipeline at John Jay College of Criminal Justice has seen firsthand that no matter the prisoner’s background or continued access to higher education outside confinement, even the most talented students struggle to find solid work and safe housing after release. “I had one student who was particularly bright,” Dreisinger recalls. "I was certain he was going to be successful.” On release, however, the student had no family to take him in, leaving him with one option: living in a dangerous halfway house.More

  • Black colleges face hard choices on $25M Koch gift

    Michael Lomax, president of the United Negro College FundAmerica's black colleges are struggling for funds. The Republican Party is struggling to attract black voters.


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  • Research, Discuss Sexual Violence on College Campuses as a Family
    As sexual assaults on college campuses make headlines, many parents of prospective college students struggle to address the issue with their families and universities. In May, the Department of Education released the names of more than 50 institutions that are under investigation for possible Title IX violations, which concern the handling of sexual violence and harassment complaints. In early July, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., released a report that found that many of the 440 institutions surveyed failed to comply with federal requirements for handling sexual assault cases. Sexual violence can be an uncomfortable topic to discuss, so experts provide the following advice on what prospective students and their parents should know about the issue as they research colleges.More

  • California law limits school football practices to cut concussions
    By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO Calif. (Reuters) - Football practices at which middle- and high-school students tackle each other will be restricted in California under a law signed on Monday by Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, the latest U.S. effort to minimize brain injuries from the popular sport. The measure, which limits practices with full-on tackling during the playing season and prohibits them during most of the off-season, comes amid growing concern nationwide over brain damage that can result from concussions among student as well as professional athletes. "This is a very balanced approach," said Democratic Assemblyman Ken Cooley, the law's author. It's good for kids and it's good for parents." The measure, which goes into effect in January, makes California the 20th state to restrict practices by middle school and high school football teams during which tackling and other full-contact activities are allowed.More

  • The Scopes Monkey trial and the Constitution
    On July 21, 1925, the famous Scopes Monkey trial over teaching evolution in public schools concluded. Mostly remembered today was the clash between two legendary public figures. But the legal fight didn’t end that day in Tennessee.More

  • 3-D Printing Becomes Accessible for High School Teachers
    Imagine a classroom where teens design and manufacture a chess set, a scanner or even a prosthetic hand, for pennies on the dollar.More

  • Colleges woo Native Americans with new programs

    Native Americans gather for a drum circle before workshop sessions at University of California, Riverside on Thursday, June 26, 2014 in Riverside, Calif. Few Native Americans go to college and most of those who do never graduate. To improve those statistics, more colleges are offering camps where teens from different tribes are exposed to college life and taught how higher education and their cultural identities can complement each other.(AP Photo/Chris Carlson)RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — Elijah Watson knows he wants to go to college. He also knows that it will be difficult to leave home on the Navajo reservation if he does.


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  • Is Good Food a Human Right for Prisoners?
    Since January, at least five appearances by maggots in food or in the kitchen have been reported just in Ohio prisons, according to the records of food service operator Aramark Correctional Services. With prison cafeterias’ blotted quality-control history—including recent cases of prisoners being served expired bologna and live maggots—some prisoner advocates say there should be a baseline standard for the food served behind bars, similar to the nutritional standards guiding food service in public schools. “Everyone should have the right to decent food—adequate, nutritious food,” says Alex Friedmann, managing editor of Prison Legal News, an independent publication of the Human Rights Defense Center. “It’s not just that the [prison] food is bad, which generally it is.More

  • MIT Offers A Really Cool Course – Oh, And It’s Free
    Many colleges and universities offer free online courses for students, including giants in the higher-education industry like Harvard and Yale. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the OpenCourseWare program allows students to choose from literally thousands of free online courses ranging from business to art. According to Gizmodo, one course of note is MIT’s “Documentary of Photography” and “Photojournalism: A History of the World in Motion” course.More