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(27-04-2011)
  • Anti-Israel divestment push gains traction at US colleges

    In this photo provided by the The Daily Northwestern, Northwestern University students celebrate after the Associated Student Government Senate passed a Northwestern Divest-sponsored resolution in Evanston, Ill. just before 1:30 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015. The resolution asks the university to divest from six corporations the resolution’s sponsors say violate Palestinians' human rights. (AP Photo/The Daily Northwestern, Nathan Richards)NEW YORK (AP) — The ritual has become increasingly commonplace on many American college campuses: A student government body takes up Israeli policy toward the Palestinians and decides whether to demand their school divest from companies that work with the Jewish state.


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  • Two Seattle-area high schools cancel classes after threats
    By Eric M. Johnson and Victoria Cavaliere SEATTLE (Reuters) - Two Seattle-area high schools were evacuated and later canceled classes on Friday after receiving security threats, and another high school in Washington state heightened its security after a threatening message was scrawled on a bathroom wall. Interlake High School in the Seattle suburb of Bellevue was put on lockdown and classroom doors were locked with students inside after administrators were told of an anonymous threat of a school shooting on campus, the Bellevue School District said in a statement on its website. "At this time the District and the Bellevue Police Department have made the decision to close Interlake High for the remainder of the school day and to release students," a statement said. In Des Moines, a city south of Seattle, Mount Rainier High school students were evacuated to nearby schools on Friday morning after the school received a bomb threat, an official with the Highline School District said.More

  • Notre Dame president credited for transforming school dies

    FILE - The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C, president emeritus of the University of Notre Dame, talks about his experiences over 90 years of life at his desk in the Hesburgh Library on the campus of the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind., in this Sept. 24, 2007 file photo. The priest who transformed the University of Notre Dame into an academic power during his 35 years in charge while also serving as an adviser to popes and presidents died Thursday night Feb. 26, 2015 at age 97 according to University spokesman Paul Browne. (AP Photo/Joe Raymond, File)SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh transformed the University of Notre Dame into a school known almost as much for academics as for football, even if it meant challenging popes, presidents or legendary football coaches.


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  • 4 Questions to Ask Before Enrolling in a For-Profit Online Program
    "Don't count on the idea that these schools are going to watch out for you and only enroll students who are going to succeed -- it's not realistic," he says. The good news is the federal regulations, which kick in the summer, will require schools to release the debt-to-income ratios of their students. Before students sign up for an online, for-profit program, they should make sure they know what kind of credential and accreditation they need to enter their job or profession, says William G. Tierney, professor of higher education at University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education.More

  • Lesbian kiss on Korean drama sparks debate

    Two women kiss during a scene from the tv drama 'Seonam Girls High School Investigators', February 27, 2015 in this image from South Korean cable TV network and broadcasting company JTBCAn unprecedented lesbian kiss between two high school students on a popular South Korean TV drama has fuelled a debate about portrayals of sexuality in a rapidly modernising society with deeply conservative roots. Homosexuality is not illegal in South Korea, but carries a significant social stigma, with few openly gay public figures.


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  • LA teachers, union leaders rally amid stalled talks

    Susana Mercado, left, and Linda Cardwell chant slogans as they join thousands of fellow teachers for a rally to demand higher wages and smaller class sizes amid stalled contract negotiations, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Los Angeles. United Teachers Los Angeles is asking for an 8.5 percent pay increase, a demand the Los Angeles Unified district says cannot be met without significant layoffs. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dressed in red and raising signs into the air, thousands of teachers filled a downtown Los Angeles park on Thursday in demand of higher wages and smaller class sizes amid stalled contract negotiations.


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  • Los Angeles teachers, union leaders rally amid stalled talks

    LA teachers, union leaders rally amid stalled talksDressed in red and raising signs into the air, thousands of teachers filled a downtown Los Angeles park Thursday to demand higher wages and smaller class sizes amid stalled contract negotiations. "Everybody ...


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  • LeBron not happy colleges recruiting 10-year-old son
    As an Ohio teenage hoops sensation, LeBron James went through the craziness of being recruited by colleges across the country. Now, he's living it as a dad.More

  • 2 arrested in connection with alleged job scam targeting students
    Philadelphia police have arrested two women in connection with an alleged job scam that targeted high school students.More

  • Use Federal Financial Aid to Pay for College Abroad
    In today's global environment, more and more American students choose to complete at least part of their higher education credentials at a school outside the U.S.More

  • Consider Whether to Take an Online Course at Community College
    Though experts say the way employers view community college learning is improving, it can vary by industry. Still, with the flexibility to enroll in a single course or even a specialized industry certification program, the benefits of online community college classes may outweigh the risk. Instead, online community college students need to have strong internal motivation, she adds. Industries with quickly evolving practices may actually prioritize it, says Judy Baker, the dean of online learning at Foothill College just outside of San Jose, California.More

  • Christie sets out teachers' pension reform

    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) attends the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce 78th annual "Walk to Washington and Congressional Dinner"By Luciana Lopez TRENTON, N.J. (Reuters) - New Jersey Governor Chris Christie said he had struck a deal with the state's teachers on a road map for pension reform while warning of a dire future if other unions do not make similar commitments to cut the cost of workers' retirement benefits. The governor's office later acknowledged that more work remained to be done on pension reform. The agreement between Christie, a Republican weighing a 2016 bid for the White House, and the New Jersey Education Association came despite a long-bitter relationship and continuing uncertainty over many details. "If we do not reform, next year we would be asked to spend nearly $8 billion on pension and health benefits," said Christie in his annual budget address on Tuesday afternoon in the state capital.


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  • NJ's Christie strikes tentative teachers' pension deal

    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) attends the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce 78th annual "Walk to Washington and Congressional Dinner"By Luciana Lopez Trenton, NJ (Reuters) - New Jersey Governor Chris Christie struck a deal with the state's teachers on a "road map" for pension reform while warning of a dire future if other unions do not make similar commitments to cut the cost of workers' retirement benefits. The tentative agreement between Christie, a Republican weighing a bid for the White House in 2016, and the New Jersey Education Association marked a dramatic turn in a long-bitter relationship.


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  • Legislature asked to boost funding for UNLV medical school
    Nevada higher education officials on Tuesday asked legislators for three times more money than the governor has proposed to ramp up construction of a medical school in Las Vegas. Nevada System of Higher ...More

  • Taylor Swift gives $50,000 in song proceeds to NYC schools

    FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2015 file photo, singer Taylor Swift attends the SNL 40th Anniversary Special in New York. Swift has donated $50,000 to the New York City public schools.The city tourism bureau tapped Swift as “global welcome ambassador” last year even though critics noted she was a recent transplant to New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)NEW YORK (AP) — New York City's official booster Taylor Swift has donated $50,000 to the city's public schools.


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  • Adopting Through Foster Care: a Less Expensive Alternative
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Children's Bureau reports that nearly 400,000 American children were in foster care in 2012, and about a quarter of those were waiting to be adopted. Many potential adoptive parents don't realize that "because these children are in the custody of the county or the state, that county or state covers all those court costs that an individual would pay for a private agency," explains Rita Soronen, president and CEO of the nonprofit Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. Parents may need to pay upfront for a home study (when a social worker interviews the family in their home), she adds, but typically those costs can be reimbursed through workplace adoption benefits, military adoption benefits or adoption tax credits. The majority of children adopted through foster care receive a financial or medical subsidy from their state until they reach the age of majority in that state, and many states offer college tuition waivers for adopted youth, which can further reduce a family's costs, Soronen adds.More

  • S.C. State struggles to stay afloat: Can historically black colleges survive?
    A financial crisis plaguing the South Carolina State University has pushed a larger issue into the spotlight: the fate of historically black colleges and universities across the United States. Earlier this month, South Carolina lawmakers proposed shutting down the state's only public historically black college for a two-year period. The announcement came the same week President Obama met with the Congressional Black Caucus to discuss the future of the nation's historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs. To the chagrin of many attending the meeting, Mr. Obama reportedly said that the lowest performing institutions "should fall by the wayside." The discussion raised questions about the future of HBCUs in America, institutions that have received flak in recent years for being financially unsustainable and leaving graduates poorly prepared and crippled with debt.More

  • 10 Colleges Where Graduates Have the Least Student Loan Debt
    The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.More

  • The Best Investment the U.S. Could Make — Affordable Higher Education

    The Best Investment the U.S. Could Make — Affordable Higher EducationThe most frequently cited remedy for rising inequality is more and better education. According to this view, many workers do not have the skills they need to be successful in a globalized economy, and this “skills gap” can only be overcome through improved educational outcomes. First, wages have stagnated for both the college educated and those without a college degree. So a college education is no guarantee of immunity from rising inequality.


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  • District appeals ruling sparing teachers from health costs

    District appeals ruling sparing teachers from health costsPhiladelphia's public school system is asking the state Supreme Court to reverse a lower court ruling that bars it from unilaterally imposing health care costs on unionized teachers.


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