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Property Education 

(27-04-2011)
  • Conn. governor critical of town considering arming teachers
    KENT, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut town is considering a program that trains teachers to use guns in the event of an active shooter, and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has come down hard on the idea.More

  • In contentious debate, Clinton and Sanders both claim 'progressive' mantle

    Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Senator Sanders and former Secretary of State Clinton speak as they discuss issues during the Democratic presidential candidates debate sponsored by MSNBC at the University of New Hampshire in DurhamBy Amanda Becker DURHAM, N.H. (Reuters) - Democrat Hillary Clinton went on the attack against rival Bernie Sanders on Thursday in their most contentious presidential debate yet, questioning whether his ambitious proposals were viable and accusing him of an "artful smear" in suggesting she could be bought by political donations. Sanders fought back repeatedly, questioning Clinton's progressive credentials and portraying her as a creature of the political establishment in a debate that featured heated exchanges on healthcare, college tuition funding and efforts to rein in Wall Street. The intensity reflected a race that has seen Clinton's once prohibitive lead in polls shrivel against Sanders as the two vie for the Democratic nomination for the Nov. 8 election.


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  • Rural Oklahoma school posts warning of armed staff
    A rural school district in Oklahoma put up signs this week alerting visitors that some staff members have access to guns, in what it says is an effort aimed at deterring school violence. Schools in Okay, Okla., about 48 miles southeast of Tulsa put up signs that read, “Please be aware that certain staff members at Okay Public Schools can be legally armed and may use whatever force is necessary to protect our students,” the Tulsa World reports. The signs follow up on a gun policy in the district’s schools – which serve 420 students – approved by the school board in August that says staff members may bring a gun to campus concealed on their person or kept in a locked box.More

  • Meek Mill uses life experiences as word of caution to students

    Meek Mill uses life experiences as word of caution to studentsA Philadelphia rapper brought a cautionary tale to local high school students on Thursday.


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  • Only hours left for winner to claim $63 million California lotto prize

    A customer shows their tickets for the Powerball lottery at the CA lotto store in San Bernardino County, CaliforniaOnly hours remained on Thursday for the buyer of a $63 million lottery ticket sold last year in Southern California to claim the prize before the money gets turned over to public schools in what would be the biggest forfeited jackpot in state history. The winning SuperLotto Plus ticket was sold last August at a 7-Eleven convenience store in the Los Angeles community of Chatsworth. The prize, if not accepted by 5 p.m. PST, will set the record as the largest unclaimed California lottery jackpot, surpassing the $28.5 million for a ticket sold in September 2003.


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  • Why did Detroit Public Schools bar union's inspectors?
    The Detroit’s teachers union isn’t happy with the city’s public schools, after district officials barred the union's health inspectors from entering school grounds. The Detroit Federation of Teachers had invited the environmental experts to check out possible health and safety concerns inside nine schools. "Prohibiting health inspectors to enter schools further erodes the trust of the school community.More

  • Explore Career Programs at Trade Schools, Community Colleges
    Students who want to learn a trade in less time than it takes to earn a bachelor's degree, and in some cases for less money, can look to technical schools and vocational programs at community colleges for the training they need to start a career. Vocational programs offer skills training and certification in specific career fields such as car repair or welding. The programs are offered by four-year colleges, community colleges and stand-alone institutions.More

  • Why Community Colleges Can’t Solve America’s Higher Ed Woes

    Why Community Colleges Can’t Solve America’s Higher Ed WoesAs the cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s higher-ed agenda—and a traditional, budget-friendly alternative to spiraling tuition at four-year schools—community colleges have morphed from educational afterthought to a key component in the nation’s plans to lead the world in college graduates by 2020. According to the report, 80 percent of new community college students intend to earn a bachelor’s degree.


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  • Zambia closes two government universities after student protests
    Zambia closed two government universities on Wednesday following violent student protests over unpaid meal allowances, its higher education minister said. Minister Michael Kaingu said the government had indefintely closed the University of Zambia and Copperbelt University to protect people's lives and property. Police had apprehended 26 University of Zambia students who blocked a road and stoned motor vehicles in Lusaka late on Tuesday during the protest, police spokeswoman Charity Chanda said.More

  • Chicago Public Schools sells bonds to keep doors open
    Chicago Public Schools has sold $725 million in tax-exempt bonds it says will help get the district through the rest of the school year. Because the district has received a low credit rating, it must pay ...More

  • How can schools stop giving students bad tests?
    The US Department of Education on Tuesday called for states to find and weed out “low-quality, redundant or unhelpful testing” in their schools, and offered guidance to support the process. Acting US Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr., in a release sent to states’ top school officials, acknowledged that many students are spending too much class time taking tests, and that exams can be overemphasized or less effective than other school activities. “High-quality assessments give parents, educators and students useful information about whether students are developing the critical thinking and problem solving skills they need to succeed in life,” Dr. King said in a department video posted online Tuesday.More

  • Teachers, students protest education system in Hungary

    Participants holds a banner that reads 'For our children!' during a teachers’ strike near Herman Otto Grammar School in Miskolc, 173 kms northeast of Budapest, Hungary, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. Thousands of teachers, students and parents in several cities in Hungary are protesting against the government's centralization of the education system and the increasing overburdening of pupils and educators. (Janos Vajda/MTI via AP)MISKOLC, Hungary (AP) — Thousands of teachers, students and parents in several cities in Hungary protested Wednesday against the government's centralization of the education system and the increasing overburdening of pupils and educators.


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  • Is This Why So Many Students Have Too Much Debt?

    Is This Why So Many Students Have Too Much Debt?Almost all college financial aid officers (95 percent) believe that their office has a responsibility to educate students in financial literacy. Nearly 60 percent of the financial aid officers surveyed said that they struggled to get support from campus leadership for financial literacy. The U.S. Department of Education requires entrance and exit counseling for those taking out student loans, but less than half of those surveyed believed that those programs were effective in teaching students everything they need to know about financial aid and borrowing.


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  • San Francisco could become 1st city to ban eviction of teachers during school year

    San Francisco could become 1st city to ban eviction of teachers during school yearSan Francisco could become the first city to ban the eviction of teachers from their homes during the school year.


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  • Chicago schools to cut spending after teachers reject offer
    The Chicago Public schools (CPS) will turn to layoffs and reduced pension contributions after its contract offer to teachers was rejected on Monday, school Chief Executive Officer Forrest Claypool said on Tuesday. "We do not want to do this," Claypool told reporters, referring to the planned cuts, which a school spokeswoman initially said would save $165 million for the current budget. Claypool added that the top priority is to keep classroom doors open.More

  • Chicago schools announce cuts after union rejects offer

    FILE - In this July 16, 2015, file photo, Chicago Public Schools District CEO Forrest Claypool listens to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel during a news conference in Chicago. Chicago school officials said Tuesday Feb. 2, 2016, they're ready to cut $100 million from school budgets and force teachers to pay more pension costs after the teachers' union rejected the latest offer in contentious contract negotiations that have lasted over a year. Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis shot back, calling the district's announcement the "latest act of war." (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)CHICAGO (AP) — Officials with Chicago Public Schools said Tuesday they're ready to cut $100 million from school budgets and force teachers to pay more pension costs after their union rejected the latest contract offer, ratcheting up the tone of contentious negotiations that have lasted over a year.


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  • The Latest: Teachers' union wants local control for district

    This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo shows Saginaw City Manager Darnell Earley at a news conference in Saginaw, Mich. Earley, the state-appointed emergency manager for Detroit's troubled school district, is leaving the job about 4½ months early, Gov. Rick Snyder announced Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Saginaw News, Jeff Schrier, File) LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUTDETROIT (AP) — The Latest on the state-appointed emergency manager for the Detroit Public Schools stepping down (all times local):


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  • State manager for Detroit schools leaving job months early

    This Sept. 21, 2012 file photo shows Saginaw City Manager Darnell Earley at a news conference in Saginaw, Mich. Earley, the state-appointed emergency manager for Detroit's troubled school district, is leaving the job about 4½ months early, Gov. Rick Snyder announced Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Saginaw News, Jeff Schrier, File) LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUTLANSING, Mich. (AP) — Criticized on two fronts for his role in Flint's lead-tainted water crisis and his handling of teacher sick-outs and building conditions in Detroit's troubled public schools, Darnell Earley has decided to step down from his job as the state-appointed emergency manager for Michigan's largest school district before the end of his 18-month term.


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  • Detroit school system's manager to step down this month
    Detroit Public Schools' emergency manager Darnell Earley is stepping down later this month, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder said on Tuesday. Earley, who has drawn criticism from the teachers union and black state lawmakers for the crumbling state of the city's schools, will leave the school district on Feb. 29, the governor said in a statement. Earley, who had formerly presided over the city of Flint and its now lead-contaminated water system, has served as manager of the Detroit schools since January 2015.More

  • Bizarre Cosby twist: former prosecutor to testify on his behalf
    A former district attorney who says he struck a "non-prosecution" deal with Bill Cosby in return for the actor's testimony in a civil lawsuit will be Mr. Cosby's star witness on Tuesday, as his lawyers attempt to throw out the only criminal case brought against him, despite years of allegations that he drugged and sexually assaulted dozens of women. Bruce Castor Jr. promised Cosby he would not be prosecuted if he testified freely in a 2005 civil lawsuit brought by Andrea Constand, the former Temple University women's basketball team manager who claims that Cosby gave her pills and sexually assaulted her in 2004.More