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(27-04-2011)
  • Gun-Toting Teachers Might Be Allowed to Shoot Your Aggressive Kid
    As a teacher with 15 years of experience in Texas classrooms, Heidi Langan believes teachers have the skills and training to mediate tense situations. While there may be incidents of violence in some classrooms across the country, her students (she is a music teacher at Austin’s Galindo Elementary School) are less of a threat than older kids at the middle and high school levels, where school shootings are more likely.More

  • State Takes Over Arkansas School District That Had To Make Teachers Wear Underwear
    Things have gone from bad to worse for the public school system in Little Rock, Ark. In August 2013, the district announced — to the great dismay of the teachers union — a dress code that would require teachers to wear underwear. Now, a mere 18 months later, the Arkansas Department of Education has voted to assume control over management of the school district, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports. The narrow 5-4 vote on Wednesday by the state school board effectively wrests control of the district from the local school board (but keeps Superintendent Dexter Suggs on the job on an interim basis).More

  • Experts Debate Graduation Rates for Online Students
    Prospective students have a variety of factors to think about when they're choosing their online programs: accreditation, faculty credentials and prestige, among others. Graduation rates rarely make the top of the list. The public can be forgiven for associating online education with low completion and graduation rates. There has been little national research comparing completion rates for online and on-campus college and graduate programs, says Peter Shea, associate provost for online learning and an education professor at University of Albany--SUNY.More

  • China education minister demands rejection of Western values
    BEIJING (AP) — China's education minister has issued a stern warning against threats to communist ideological purity in higher education, saying Western values must never be permitted to infiltrate the classroom.More

  • US colleges seek economic diversity in students from China

    In this Nov. 20, 2014 photo, Yupei Guo, top, greets friend Serene Silin Li at Yale University, in New Haven, Conn. With more undergraduates coming from overseas than ever, some Ivy League universities are reaching out in new ways to attract international students of more varied backgrounds -- and particularly from China, which sends more students to the U.S. than any other country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)NEW HAVEN, Connecticut (AP) — Top American universities like Yale and Harvard, widely regarded overseas as places only for children of the rich and powerful, are increasing efforts to attract the best international students, regardless of their financial backgrounds.


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  • Myanmar police to DNA test soldiers over murdered teachers

    People attend a funeral service of two school teachers in Myitkyina, northern Myanmar, on January 23, 2015Myanmar police Thursday said they will conduct DNA tests on soldiers and residents in a northern village where two young teachers were murdered in a crime that has sparked widespread public anger. "We have collected hair samples of 25 soldiers who were on duty that night as well as from 10 villagers," lieutenant San Lwin of Shan state police force told AFP. The samples have been sent to the capital Naypyidaw for DNA testing to check against strands of hair found in the hands of both the deceased women, he added. Maran Lu Ra, 20, and Tangbau Hkawn Nan Tsin, 21, were volunteer teachers at IDP camps near the border town of Muse in Shan, parts of which have also been wracked by conflict between Myanmar's army and ethnic minority rebels in recent years.


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  • Dartmouth College to ban hard alcohol on campus
    (Reuters) - Dartmouth College will ban hard alcohol on campus as it seeks to cut down on binge drinking among students, the Ivy League school's president said on Thursday. The ban, which applies to students and all college-sponsored events, comes at a time when universities across the United States are trying to fight what the White House has described as an "epidemic" of sexual assault. The Hanover, New Hampshire, college is among the more than 50 elite U.S. learning institutions that the Department of Education is investigating to see if their policies on sex assault violate U.S. laws requiring equal treatment for men and women in higher education. Researchers say the culture of binge drinking on college campuses has fueled sex assaults.More

  • Scholarships to Help International Students Afford U.S. Colleges
    American colleges and universities are among the best in the world, and for many students from around the globe, attending college in the U.S. would be a dream come true. Every year, thousands of students from nearly every continent flock to campuses across the U.S. to earn their degrees and take what they've learned back home. Though it's true that American colleges and universities are far from free, many offer generous scholarships to international students, and there are a handful of private scholarships available to students as well. Before you write it off as impossible, check out scholarship opportunities for funding your American college dream.More

  • Top US colleges push for more diverse students from China

    US colleges seek economic diversity in students from ChinaYupei Guo does not fit the mold of the traditional Ivy League student from China: Her journalist parents are neither rich nor members of the governing elite. Growing up, she thought the cost would make ...


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  • S&P report backs Gov. Jerry Brown's call to tame spending
    A new financial report released Wednesday backs Gov. Jerry Brown's call to avoid new spending, despite pressure from fellow Democrats to use the surplus on social services, higher education and other programs. ...More

  • Revenge of the Upper Middle Class

    Revenge of the Upper Middle ClassThe Obama administration surely didn't think it was penalizing its core middle-class constituency when it proposed, earlier this month, to raise taxes on college savings accounts known as 529s. After all, a majority of those accounts are held by people earning more than $150,000 a year, and the administration was proposing the change to pay for expanding a tuition tax credit for families making less than that. Yet as the backlash to the proposal demonstrated, the soaring cost of a college education makes even a six-figure income seem small, and the definition of "middle class" quite elastic. In a remarkably quick turnaround, the White House on Tuesday dropped the 529 plan just over a week after announcing it.


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  • Online Degrees Could Be a Good Fit for Some Teens
    Four-year universities are the gold standard for higher education in the U.S., but for many students , the cost and commitment is unbearable. Less than 10 percent of the undergraduates at Pennsylvania State University--World Campus, ranked the No. 1 online bachelor's program, are traditional students who enrolled after graduating from high school, says Karen Pollack, director of undergraduate programs for the school. High school counselors don't have the same relationship with and training on online degree programs as they do with community colleges and universities, says Sylvia Womack, a college and career specialist at Polytechnic High School in Long Beach, California. As a result, high school counselors are less likely to know enough about degree programs to confidently suggest them to students who are looking for college options outside of the traditional structure.More

  • Hutchinson proposes boosting Medicaid, schools, prison funds

    Hutchinson proposes boosting Medicaid, schools, prison fundsArkansas' public schools, prisons and Medicaid program would receive boosts in funding while most other state agencies would see a small cut under a $5.2 billion budget plan Gov. Asa Hutchinson presented ...


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  • School-wide prevention program lowers teen suicide risk
    (This version of the Jan. 23rd story corrects name of the University of South Florida in paragraph 16) By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) – After a school-based prevention program, European teenagers were about half as likely to attempt suicide or to feel suicidal, a new study shows. Danuta Wasserman, a professor of psychiatry at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said the program was likely successful because students “felt that the power of mastering their feelings, coping with stress and choosing solutions was in their hands and not decided or forced by adults.” Suicide is the third leading cause of death between the ages of 10 and 24, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Suicide attempts are even more common, with some research suggesting that 4 to 8 percent of high school students try to kill themselves each year, the CDC says.More

  • Pakistani teachers get gun training after Peshawar massacre

    Pakistani teachers handle various firearms during a weapons training session for school, college and university teachers at a police training centre in Peshawar on January 27, 2015Teachers in northwest Pakistan are being given firearms training and will be allowed to take guns into the classroom in a bid to strengthen security following a Taliban massacre at a school last month. Heavily armed militants killed 150 people, 132 of them children, in a bloody December 16 attack on an army-run school in Peshawar, the main town in Pakistan's northwest. "Carrying firearms for every teacher is not obligatory, but all those who want to carry firearms to schools willingly will be provided with permits," Atif Khan, provincial education minister for the northwestern province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, told AFP on Tuesday. Provincial Information Minister Mushtaq Ghani confirmed the decision, adding that the province was unable to provide police guards for all of its government-run education institutions.


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  • Arkansas governor details budget for coming year

    Hutchinson proposes boosting Medicaid, schools, prison fundsArkansas' public schools, prisons and Medicaid program would receive boosts in funding while most other state agencies would see a small cut under a $5.2 billion budget plan Gov. Asa Hutchinson presented ...


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  • Chile's Bachelet prepares next phase of education reform

    Chile's President Bachelet delivers a speech during the High Level Segment of the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP 20 in LimaChile's President Michelle Bachelet said on Tuesday her government was preparing the second phase of an ambitious education reform, hours after Congress approved the first set of changes. "What we've put an end to here is a set of illegitimate bases put in place during the dictatorship, behind the nation's back, and today we've recovered Chile's historic tradition and the best practices in the world," said Education Minister Nicolas Eyzaguirre. The government will now look to bolster teacher pay and conditions, bring public schools, now managed and financed by townships, under national jurisdiction, and make university education free, Bachelet said. Months of massive student protests, demanding major changes to an education system that was privatized under then-dictator General Augusto Pinochet, helped shape the 2013 electoral campaign and propel Bachelet into power.


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  • The Originals "Brotherhood of the Damned" Review: Food Fight!

    The Originals "Brotherhood of the Damned" Review: Food Fight!The Originals S02E11: "Brotherhood of the Damned" If history is written by the winners, it's up to artists to keep telling the stories of the forgotten. Specifically, not enough people are talking about the black vampire soldiers of World War I. Sure, we've heard all kinds of things about the War to End All Wars—archduke assassinations, heartwarming Christmas Eve soccer games—but the story of black vampires soldiers' contributions remain woefully underrepresented. Okay, fine, I'm sort of joking here, but it really is true that sometimes a teen supernatural drama does more to honor underreported history than most other artforms. Teen Wolf recently invoked the Japanese internment scandal of WWII in a more resonant and engaging way than any pop culture art I can think of. And this week The Originals portrayed its own spin on the Harlem Hellfighters, an outrageously obscure (i.e., not taught in public schools) regiment of black soldiers who fought for a country that wouldn't even guarantee their rights and safety within its own borders. Yes, in both examples these true scenarios were intruded upon by fictional supernatural hunks, but still: Some stories need to be told regardless of the genre. Unlike most other TV shows, The Originals does not shy away from this responsibility. By now we know that the primary side effect of a werewolf bite isn't death, but flashbacks! In "Brotherhood of the Damned," Marcel's werewolf bite sent his memories back to the time he enlisted in the army during WWI. Klaus forbade him from going overseas (referring to the humans' great international war as a "food fight"), but Marcel's journey took him there anyway, where he was suddenly watching his friends die ignoble foxhole deaths. After a particularly savvy compatriot sussed out that Marcel was (A) a vampire, and therefore (B) the most capable leader in their midst, Marcel took on the responsibility of keeping his unit alive. Unfortunately mustard gas had other ideas, and the soldiers were all choking to death on their own blood. That's when Marcel had his aha moment: Turn 'em! Turn 'em all! And then we were treated to the episode's best and most potent image: Marcel leading a troupe of black vampire soldiers across a battle-scarred field toward the German army. Guys? It was the best. Forget flashbacks, I want an en entire EPISODE focused on this plotline. But the flashbacks were more than simply an amazing visual; they perfectly paralleled what Marcel was going through in the present day. Specifically, he needed to lead his vampire comrades out of the compound and through a parade without any of them giving in to a curse that made them crave the blood of innocents. That this sequence was intercut with the WWI flashback was just straight-up inspired and powerful, and did more to confirm Marcel's heroic nature than the season and a half that preceded it. For as often as The Originals' flashbacks seem to be merely a gratuitous excuse to put the actors in hilarious wigs and get them to rip each others' bodices, the ones that draw upon the grim energy of true history that really resonate. If it's not clear by now, I really loved these flashbacks! As it turned out, mentally visiting another realm became the episode's biggest theme when Finn used magic to trap his three brothers' consciences in a witch holodeck (or whatever). Stuck in a very cool rustic cabin flanked with animals that represented each Mikaelson—a wolf for Klaus, a stag for Elijah, and a fox for Kol—they were unable to return to their physical bodies until Finn discovered what Klaus's biggest secret was. It was kind of implausible that Finn couldn't use magic to discover that Hope was still alive, but was perfectly capable of using some of the most powerful magic we've seen in this universe to do all these other huge things, but whatever. This sequence in particular took on an added poetry when Elijah and Klaus freed themselves by severing their ties to their taxidermied spirit animals. Elijah, for example, was not a noble stag in that he had once murdered Tatia all those years ago, and Klaus refused to be associated with the dastardly wolf by forgiving Elijah for said crime. (Sounds complicated, but it played out beautifully on the screen.) Long story short, The Originals continues to casually traffic in some of the most intellectually complicated and elegant concepts on network television. The other big thread of "Brotherhood of the Damned" was Hayley's meet-up with Jackson's grandmother. As a Crescent Wolf elder, the grandmother would be administering their werewolf rites, trials, tests, hazing, and game of werewolf Twister before actually marrying them and spreading her hybrid powers to the rest of the wolves. But when Hayley found out that one of the rites involved smoking truth-weed and divulging all her secrets—including the pesky one about having a living baby—she tried to back out of the plan. Jackson somehow managed to change her mind, but then Klaus caught wind of this ritual and now seeks to stop it by any means necessary. Watch out, grandma! Yes, Josh and Aiden appeared in this episode, but never in the same scene, so. That being said, "Brotherhood of the Damned" was still pretty great. It's hard to say for how much longer this Finn plotline will hold our attention, but as long as The Originals continues to be this inventive and well-constructed, it's hard to complain. In the meantime, I for one would like to publicly thank all the black vampire soldiers who bravely defended our nation. We salute you, sirs. QUESTIONS: ... Roughly how many holidays are observed in the French Quarter every year? 7,000? 19,000? ... Would you let Cami babysit your child? ... What's Rebekah up to in that witch prison? ... Could you marry someone like Jackson and stay "just friends"? Be honest.


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  • Students, teachers hospitalized after chemistry lab mishap in N.J.

    Students, teachers hospitalized after chemistry lab mishap in N.J.Gloucester County emergency crews responded to a high school after a chemistry lab mishap Monday morning.


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  • Foster Civil Discourse in High School Civics Classes
    High school civics classes are making a comeback and along with them come discussions of highly charged issues in the classroom. This month, Arizona became the first state to approve a law requiring high school students pass the U.S. citizenship test in order to graduate, a regulation several other states are considering, The Associated Press reported. "You can't just assume that people understand these rights and responsibilities and these habits," says Mary Ellen Daneels, a U.S. government teacher at Community High School in West Chicago, Illinois. Civics education usually covers the basics of democracy and citizenship.More