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(27-04-2011)
  • 5 Reasons We Shouldn’t Be So Surprised by What Kids Wish Teachers Knew

    5 Reasons We Shouldn’t Be So Surprised by What Kids Wish Teachers KnewOn Friday, the story of #IWishMyTeacherKnew, the effort by Denver elementary school teacher Kyle Schwartz to get students in her classroom to share something about themselves, went viral across the Web. Schwartz has been posting poignant photos of her students’ reflections on Twitter since March and encouraging other teachers to do the same. Some Americans have been feeling a bit shocked by the kids’ brief messages, which detail bullying, poverty, and the detrimental impact of incarceration and immigration on the lives of students. 1. Child poverty is on the rise.


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  • High school student takes a swing with baseball board game

    High school student takes a swing with baseball board gamePlenty of high school students dream of becoming game designers, and a few go ahead and make their own video games. Nathaniel designed the basic rules of the game when he was a small boy, stuck inside on rainy days and unable to play his favorite sport. "They have been very easy to work with and gave great advice when we needed help or when they thought something should be changed," said Nathaniel. Nathaniel and his pals have been selling the game on the streets of their local town.


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  • Chicago schools chief to take temporary leave amid probe

    FILE - In this Oct. 12, 2012 file photo, newly appointed Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett speaks at a news conference in Chicago. Byrd-Bennett's attorney Michael Scudder confirmed a letter was sent Friday, April 17, 2015, to Board of Education members that Byrd-Bennett has requested a leave effective April 20 amid a federal investigation over a $20.5 million no-bid contract the district awarded to a training academy where she once consulted. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett will take a paid leave of absence amid a federal investigation over a roughly $20 million no-bid contract the district awarded to a training academy where she once worked as a consultant, officials announced Friday.


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  • Chicago schools chief takes leave amid federal probe
    By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) - Chicago Public Schools Chief Executive Officer Barbara Byrd-Bennett is taking a leave of absence pending the outcome of a federal probe into a contract the district awarded to a company that had previously employed her, officials said on Friday. "In light of the ongoing federal investigation and its impact on her ability to effectively lead Chicago Public Schools, Barbara Byrd-Bennett is taking a leave of absence from Chicago Public Schools effective immediately," Board of Education President David Vitale said. Mayor Rahm Emanuel appointed Byrd-Bennett to head the nation's third-largest public school system in 2012.More

  • To divest or not to divest: College students on fossil fuel debate
    Students at Harvard University are on the final day of something called Heat Week. It's a week long protest pushing for the University to divest of fossil fuel stocks. It's a movement gaining steam at universities across the country.More

  • Lawyer: Chicago Public Schools chief requests leave amid federal probe over no-bid contract
    CHICAGO (AP) — Lawyer: Chicago Public Schools chief requests leave amid federal probe over no-bid contract.More

  • Adolescent e-cigarette use triples: Is 'vaping' renormalizing nicotine?
    The use of electronic cigarettes, or “vaping,” tripled among high-school students between 2013-2014, according to a national survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  In fact, more high-school students are smoking e-cigarettes than traditional cigarettes, the survey showed. The number of students who reported smoking traditional cigarettes declined by 25 percent between 2013 and 2014, the fastest decrease seen in years.More

  • Cyberbullying is avenged by a digital ghost in horror 'Unfriended'
    "Unfriended," out in U.S. theaters on Friday, follows six high school students gathering on the video conferencing platform Skype on the anniversary of the suicide of a fellow student, who killed herself after an embarrassing video of her was posted online. Filmed entirely as if the events are unfolding on a computer screen, a mysterious entity joins the group's Skype conversation and begins to coerce secrets out of each friend, before exacting gory revenge one by one, as the others watch in horror. It also highlights online trolls, carelessly posting insults from the safety net of being anonymous and behind a computer screen. "We're using horror movie language, but the story is about one of the biggest problems on the Internet." "Unfriended," released by Comcast Corp's Universal Pictures, was an experimental project, made for less than $1 million.More

  • How #IWishMyTeacherKnew can help teachers support students
    In an effort to better understand the complicated home lives of her third graders, one Colorado teacher challenged her students to share one thing that they wished their teacher knew about them. After sharing the sometimes heartbreaking responses on social media with the hashtag #IWishMyTeacherKnew, Kyle Schwartz of Denver started a movement among teachers globally highlighting the importance of connectivity in the classroom, especially with students who may have difficulties at home. Had my students write "I wish my teacher knew___" It's a reality check. Ms. Schwartz, a three-year educator at Doull Elementary in Denver, said the majority of her students come from poverty and rely on the National School Lunch Program for sustenance.More

  • Teaching kids about sex abuse in school ups reporting
    This reinforces the findings of previous reviews, said lead author Kerryann Walsh of Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. “The programs increase children’s knowledge of child sexual abuse concepts and their skills in reacting and responding to risky situations,” Walsh told Reuters Health by email. The reviewers analyzed 24 trials of school-based prevention programs, including a total of almost 6,000 elementary and high school students in the U.S., Canada, China, Germany, Spain, Taiwan and Turkey. Based on questionnaires and vignettes used to test the programs’ effects, kids in the programs demonstrated greater knowledge of protective behaviors and knowledge of sex abuse prevention concepts.More

  • Chicago teachers union says schools probe sign of bigger problem
    By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) - The acting head of the Chicago Teachers Union said on Thursday that a federal probe of the city's public schools chief executive points to a larger pattern of apparent conflicts of interest at the debt-troubled district. Federal authorities are investigating Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett and a $20.5 million no-bid contract the district awarded to SUPES Academy, a training facility for principals that had formerly employed her, local media reports said without naming their sources. CPS, the nation's third-largest school district with about 400,000 students, confirmed on Wednesday that federal authorities were investigating suspected misconduct and had requested interviews with employees, but gave no details. A spokesman for SUPES Academy said investigators had obtained records and that it was cooperating.More

  • E-cigarette use triples in US teens

    E-cigarette use triples in US teensSome two million US high school students tried e-cigarettes last year, a rate that tripled in just one year, US health authorities said Thursday. The 2014 survey by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 13.4 percent of high school students said they had smoked an e-cigarette in the past month, up from 4.5 percent from 2013. In middle school, some 3.9 percent of kids (about 450,000 students) said they had tried vaping in the past month according to the 2014 findings, up from 1.1 percent in 2013.


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  • E-Cig Use Triples in Adolescents, CDC Says

    E-Cig Use Triples in Adolescents, CDC SaysThe number of middle and high school students who say they've used e-cigarettes has tripled in just one year, according to new research that underscores health experts' fears about the growing popularity of these nicotine delivery devices among adolescents. About 660,000 high school students reported using e-cigarettes in 2013, but in 2014, that number increased to about 2 million, according to a study published today as part of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. And in middle school students, that number went from 120,000 to 450,000, the report said. "This level of increase in such a short time period is alarming and unprecedented," study co-author Dr. Brian King told ABC News.


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  • Why Jailing Cheating Teachers Probably Won’t Help America’s Kids

    Why Jailing Cheating Teachers Probably Won’t Help America’s Kids“The justice being served is unequal,” said Allie McCullen, Rise Up’s education justice organizer. Although “we recognize that cheating is wrong, the justice being served is unequal,” said McCullen, noting that Rise Up’s petition drive has collected more than 35,000 signatures. Most of the cheating took place at 44 schools and involved nearly 180 educators between 2005 and 2009. In 2013, a grand jury indicted 35 Atlanta Public Schools educators after an investigation revealed cheating was behind a remarkable spike in statewide aptitude scores at previously failing schools in the city.


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  • E-cig use soared, cigarette use fell among U.S. youth in 2014: CDC

    A man uses an E-cigarette in this illustration picture taken in ParisBy Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Electronic cigarette use among U.S. middle and high school students tripled in 2014 while cigarette use fell to record lows, according to provocative new data that is likely to intensify debate over whether e-cigarettes are a boon or bane to public health. Overall, tobacco use among high school students grew to 24.6 percent from 22.9 percent. "Nicotine exposure at a young age may cause lasting harm to brain development, promote addiction, and lead to sustained tobacco use," Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC, said in a statement. Mitch Zeller, director of the Food and Drug Administration's tobacco division, said the data "forces us to confront the reality that the progress we have made in reducing youth cigarette smoking rates is being threatened." But e-cigarette proponents argue that the CDC data could equally suggest that smoking rates fell because young people took up e-cigarettes instead of traditional cigarettes.


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  • Thousands of teachers in Iran demand higher wages
    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's semi-official ILNA news agency says thousands of teachers have staged nationwide protests demanding higher wages.More

  • U.S. authorities probing allegations of misconduct at Chicago schools
    By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) - Federal authorities are investigating allegations of misconduct at the Chicago Public Schools and have requested interviews with several employees, a top school official said on Wednesday. Chicago Board of Education President David Vitale did not give any further details in a statement to the media. The nation's third-largest public school district has more than 600 schools and serves about 400,000 students. "We take any allegation of misconduct seriously, and we are fully cooperating with investigators who requested that we not discuss any specifics regarding the ongoing investigation,” Vitale said.More

  • Math problem from Singapore goes viral – can you solve it?
    There’s a new viral sensation sweeping the Internet. But this time, it has nothing to do with the color of a dress or a superhuman motorcycle rider crashing and landing on top of a car. This time around, a math problem, of all things, has worked the Internet up into a frenzy. The math problem in question was initially given to High School students in Singapore who were taking the Singapore and Asian Schools Math Olympiad exam. DON’T MISS: 5 great free Android apps that do amazing things the iPhone can’t The problem reads as follows: Albert and Bernard just became friends with Cheryl, and they want to know when her birthday is. Cheryl gives them a list of 10 possible dates. MayMore

  • Senate committee examines Bush-era education law
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate committee began debating legislation Tuesday that attempts to fix the much-maligned No Child Left Behind education law by giving states more control in determining how to hold public schools accountable for student performance.More

  • Jail for 9 of 10 ex-educators in Atlanta test-cheating case

    James Butler, center, joins fellow supporters of former Atlanta public school educators who were sentenced in a cheating scandal while attending a vigil outside Fulton County Superior Court, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Atlanta. All but one of 10 former educators convicted in a widespread conspiracy to inflate student scores on standardized tests were sentenced to jail time Tuesday, and the judge called the cheating scandal "the sickest thing that's ever happened in this town." (AP Photo/David Goldman)ATLANTA (AP) — All but one of 10 former Atlanta public school educators convicted in a widespread conspiracy to inflate student scores on standardized tests were sentenced to jail time Tuesday, and the judge called the cheating scandal "the sickest thing that's ever happened in this town."


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